HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE USA: MEMORY, STATUS, AND TRENDS

Authors

  • Walter R ALLEN University of California

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14515/monitoring.2018.5.09

Keywords:

Blacks, higher education, inequality, W. E.B. DuBois, IPEDS data, Flagship Universities, Black Serving Institutions (BSIs), Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

Abstract

This article examines how and why Blacks continue to be severely underrepresented in United States colleges and universities. Longitudinal analysis of Black student enrollment and degree completion at public, four-year institutions reveals the proportion of Blacks in state populations is consistently below the proportion Blacks attending state universities. The number of African American students at flagships has declined; but more Black students attend Black- Serving institutions, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The theory and research of the great twentieth century intellectual W. E.B. DuBois helps to frame and explain the barriers to Black access and success in U. S. higher education.

Published

2018-11-10